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On Bankruptcy and Bureaucracy – UC Budgets

In Uncategorized on September 23, 2009 at 9:15 pm

Tomorrow, 9/24/09 there will be a faculty/student walk out at the UC campuses to protest recent budget-cut decisions. This is the _first_ day of classes for a few campuses [thanks for the choice date, but whatever]. UC faculty are not unionized; this is a big deal. It was recommended by the Academic Senate that furloughs be taken during instructional days (reason below). This was rejected by the Chancellors and the UC Office of the President (UCOP):


“The reason for this unilateral decision is clear: the administration seeks to evade public accountability for the manner in which it has managed the budget crisis.  It was the “optics” of the Senate Council’s recommendation that were judged untenable.  The Office of the President has failed to arrive at a plan that would protect the interests of both students and workers.  It wishes to disguise the harm this failure has done to the University’s mission.  Or better: it seeks to shift the blame for this failure to the faculty, should we be so bold as to hold the President accountable to the consequences of his own plan.  Toward this evasion, UCOP has flagrantly erased the difference between a furlough and a paycut, presenting the latter in the guise of the former.

The ten Academic Senates unanimously mandated furloughs taken on instructional days for good reasons.  These reasons exceed the particular interests of the faculty; they pertain to the collective interests of all workers and students.  Instructional furloughs pressure the state to cease defunding the UC system, and they pressure the Office of the President to confront the fact that its overall approach to budget reform is unsustainable and unjust.  UCOP seeks to alleviate that pressure by feigning the minimal impact of cuts upon the operations of the University and the education of its students.  By doing so it makes clear its real interest: not to engage in a serious reevaluation of budgetary priorities, but to occlude the necessity of doing so.”

The rest of which can be found here:
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